Anaesthetics – what I have learnt so far…

  • your ODP is your best friend and most of the time your saviour – treat them right.
  • there are literally a hundred ways to skin a cat. And more to come up with a plan for anaesthetic for any given patient. All are right and some may be wrong – try to sift though and pick and choose and delete and save – and come up with your own brand of magic
  • always be on time for a theater list – or 30-45 minutes early! Pre-op assessments are part of your learning and an integral part of why we do what we do when we give a patient a particular anaesthetic.
  • make sure you attend most if not all teaching/training days arranged by the deanery – they’re VERY particular about attendance
  • know your doses – sux, roc, propofol, local anaesthetics, etc. You may be called upon at the most surprising of moments to decide a drug amount (for example the surgeon may yell out during the procedure how much local anaesthetic he can infiltrate in his rectus sheath block and you may need to do your maths to give them the answer. Bring your A-game)
  • get ready to be surprised at how chilled and laid-back everyone and everything is. When I first entered the department I expected everyone to be on their toes, pumped full of adrenaline, dancing around critical patients who were losing their airways and fighting fires along the way – while this is essentially what happens, things aren’t quite as dramatic
  • get ready for a VERY steep earning curve. Very steep. Very. With a capital S (for steep)
  • There are 4 times more consultants in anaesthetics than emergency medicine. Even more than that. 6 weeks into my anaesthetics rotation and I still haven’t worked with or met all of them. And only 4 times have I worked with someone I have worked with already.
  • Anaesthetics is not about intubating everyone. In my first month, I had observed 58 surgical procedures – only 7 of which were intubated. The rest were mostly LMAs/iGels.
  • The best talent to have/learn is not how to intubate; How to ventilate, bag-mask is more important.
  • You will really get good at cannulation. All sorts of difficult, easy, wriggly, invisible, stubborn veins – you will put a cannula in to all sorts. And then some.
  • Will continue to update these as the time comes. Feel free to watch this space.

One thought on “Anaesthetics – what I have learnt so far…”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *