My first EM conference in the UK – The Northern Emergency Medicine Conference 2018

NEMC18

1) RCEM President address – pertinent points extolled were: good practice guide; duty of candor; work ethics; reiterated how the quality of care that we provide to patients has improved over the years; members have gone from 7 to 7500 in a matter of a few years!
He also talked about the ED exit block, what problems it created and how it wasn’t really the department itself that caused the block, but the flow out of the department, and that was basically a matter of funding and resources.
He addressed a few ‘elephants’ in the room – key concerns were the fact that demand has increased, with a 30 percent rise in ed attendances in 12 years; variations in staffing, variations in systems, variations in support/behavior of management/colleagues. He re-iterated that improvement starts at leadership at the top. Creating environment for support, momentum, culture was key in establishing good support systems for all staff – also quoted by Edward Demming in stressing the need to ‘reduce variation for optimum management.’
high quality improvement projects key to chip away at bad or lesser effective practices.
workforce is key- planning. need multidisciplinary workforce with senior decision maker layer on top, consultant cover has increased in past few years, still only about halfway there.
grow it to create depth and breadth, create strategies to reduce attrition in training, maximise retention for consultants, increase training numbers by 33 pc (80 pc from baseline to 400/year for 4 years)
plans to start dedicated leadership programs
plans to start clinical educator programs
plans to start and further increase fellowships – geriatric EM, humanitarian EM, ambulatory EM.
he also spoke about how to retain older consultants 50-55 age before the retirement age, because it can get tiring, as well as ways to support the new generation of EM consultants.

2- MacMillan Nurse John Sheridan – Palliative care
He spoke about and clarified a few terms about end of life, palliative care. He defined palliative care as ‘living as well as possible for as long as possible (usually 12 months)
33 percent bed base in every hosp, palliative at any time.
patients usually end up in ED due to poor planning, portrayal in media
usually PC is thought to be malignancy related. wrong assumption. can be any disease causing possible/probable death in 12 months. gp should e informed.
SPICT score
on call OOH Palliative care opinion always available everywhere
think about an emergency care plan upon discharge or transfer of care to home or other service. contact district nurses. dedicated palliative ambulance, dedicated palliative care nurses, bellflowers, deciding right app
scenario presented.

3- PHEM/ED consultant – shared scenario – video of resuscitation of stabbing victim – cardiac tamponade relieved prehospital. making unexpected survivors to expected survivors.

coffee break

4 – trauma network – geography, what it entails, MTC, ambulance services (usually multiple, coordinating between them, air ambulance.overnight cover. approved by nhs england.
take on calls for advice. every aspect of clinical journey. clinical guidelines education.training, sui, audits, make sure standards are maintained across the board.

5 – GEM
frailty scoring – E FRAILTY INDEX./edmonton frailty scale/CHAMP/rockwood or clinical frailty score
why? multidisciplinary. NNT 13-17 TO AVOID DEATH OR ADMISSION TO CARE HOME WITHIN 6 MONTHS. vs 17 for stroke thromb 42 for aspirin post-MI.
admtted vs discharged from ED – improves care for both/further planning etc
frail = complex. (plus sheer numbers in ED adds to danger for frail patients)

frailty scenario
delirium – VERY IMPORTANT. getting it wrong – due to our perceptipn, helpfulness of older person, lack of family carer with patient – 11 pc screening completed in 2015 audit. if missed in ed, 70 percent missed during rest of admission
another scenario
every time you chicken out of a DNACPR discussion god kills a kitten.
atul gawande
scenario

dangers of non specific general vague presentations – over 80? falls, confusion, weakness, fatigues, inability to cope – falls, usually multifctoria. MI AND PNEUMONIA DONT PRESENT IN ELDERLY TYPICALLY
major trauma USUALLY CALLED SILVER TRAUMA – is usually NAN DOWN. likely to be seen in trauma units. likely to be seen by juniors.
HECTOR
future of GEM

6- EM Trainee presentations x 3
dislocated shoulder management – shoulder relocation bench? 77 percent reduction successful without sedation
stroke vs stroke mimics (how to differentiate)
ketamine sedation audit

LUNCH

7 – “Tactical team medics”
8 – GP with EM specialist interest
9 – ACP sharing experiences and progress

COFFEE

10 – ALS – Cardiac arrest beyond the algorithm – ITU/ANAESTHETICS CONSULTANT
goodsam
children – cpr training/sweden/danish/germany/france
immediate bystander cps good – improved outcomes
less than 60 years of age good outcome
e-cpr no confirmed survivors
summary – routine application of also not leading to early rosc
focus should shift entirely in certain cases
charge defib early
always use echo
think in parallel
ecpr

11 – burnout
1/3 will have depressive episode
1/12 will consider suicide
shared personal experience

maslach burnout inventory
depersonalisation – cynicism, sarcasm, compassion fatigue
exhaustion – not sure how much longer i can go on
lack of efficacy

sources of burnout – ourselves, blame culture, NHS structure complexity
positivity of juggling this stress of work
negative stress – same things same sort of day totally different mood

how to handle the stress – time management, checklist – headspace – (physical/emotional/spiritual banks)
notification fatigue
events + rections = outcome
let it go

12 – keynote speaker – hospital response to a major incident
when you fail to prepare you prepare to fail

Transfer Training

Attended a Transfer Training course today. I know what you’re thinking, who needs training to learn how to transfer a patient? What rocket science is involved in the few seconds or minutes to transfer someone from one bed to another? Or how much of preparation and thought needs to go into transferring a patient from one hospital to another? It has to be fairly simple right? Atleast thats what I was thinking when I was applying for the course, I thought it’s going to be like a 30 minute session, Bam Bam, thanK you, Ma’am type situation. Boy was I wrong – this was an 8 hour long proceedings, and I actually learnt quite a bit. Some gems from today’s talks:

Movement effects
Movement of any sort brings with it it’s own demerits. So only move the patient if absolutely necessary. Deceleration causes gastric contents to come up; it also may cause fluid to ‘back up into the lungs’.
Acceleration causes the opposite: hypotension, decreased preload. Both may lead to heart failure

Limit affects of any sort by making sure patient is well hydrated; lift the legs up to counter hypotension(during acceleration)

Head end up (15-30 degrees), NG (during deceleration)

Consider if you need Blue light? Is it time critical? Make sure to limit sudden movements, blue light ambulances are notorious for getting into accidents (large vehicles, moving at high speeds, sometimes against traffic and/or against traffic rules)

Specially important is the need to be careful in head and spinal injury patients
Contrary to popular belief and your gut feeling, the more critical the patient, the slower the transfer needs to be. Not faster. Fast, hasty movements make for bad decisions, wrong or sharp turns (as well as deleterious effects of movements already discussed)

Static effects
Hypothermia is the most common problem
What is the first thing that happens when patients are brought in to ED? Their clothes get taken off. Coupled with cold environment, not a good combo
Children/eldery most vulnerable
Monitor patient during the transfer as well for temperature changes; aim for normothermia
HME filter is one way to counter drop in temperatures – ventilator usually gives cold, not-too-moist air going directly into the lungs, bypassing the moistening and humidifying warmth of the sinus cavities; connecting an HME filter to the ventilator circuit effectively prevents the dry cold air going in, and thereby prevents hypothermia.
Blankets and foil may be used, especially in ambulances
Pre warmed fluids may be considered
Cover open wounds/burns (cling film is best as wound is still visible for any changes, is sterile essentially and can be airtight)

Avoid vibration injury/movememt in ambulance/helicopters
Pad and protect soft tissues to avoid pressure sores, and reduce fractures where possible. Ulnar nerve is most commonly injured during transfer – bean bag padding is ideal for such transfers.
Interference can be caused with electronic monitoring by the unnecessary vibration.movement aberrations from helicopters and ambulances; dislodged/trapped leads may also be a concern.

Motion sickness may develop – stop feeding the potential transfer patient. A couple of hours of NBM won’t kill the patient, but aspirating their own vomit, or vomiting when their neck is immobilised can be quite a significant clinical concern. Consider NG (with free drainage) and sitting upright. Avoid rear-facing seats for transferring teams. Do not read/documentation, as can make things worse. Be prepared. Take antiemetics.

Communication
Sirens/alarms make communication difficult. Make sure you can always hear alarms. And, we all are guilty of doing this, but NEVER ignore alarms.

Immobilisation
Need to ensure patient can undergo immobilisation. Make sure patient can actually physically lie flat for CT scans, etc (e.g. may get short of breath if massively obese or really bad CHF)
Consider sedation (and airway protective measures) if absolutely necessary to scan and lie flat.
Make sure you have everything you need before you leave. And before you need it. Always be prepared for every eventuality, every foreseeable complication.

Lying supine can also have other deletrious effects on even patient who can lie flat – secretions can accumulate, reflux might be an issue, V/Q mismatch occurs, inability to cough when lying flat, strapping someone down for a scan may itself cause restriction of lung movements in an otherwise comfortable-in-lying-flat patient.

NOBODY GETS BETTER DURING A TRANSFER! They may get worse, so only transfer if absolutely imperative.

Special considerations?
Trauma
general information about the Trauma network
ED pitstops – their pitfalls

Head/spinal injuries – RTC, falls, sports, assaults, self harm (gunshots), and non-traumatic
Motor aspect of GCS is more important than anything else in the GCS
Immobilise with correctly fitted collars
Aim for Normal pO2
Normal pCO2 is now the new teaching, as low PCO2 (which was previously the guidelines) causes cerebral vasoconstriction, reducing blood flow, and ischemia is a far worse complication than brain swelling, atleast in the initial phase of the post-injury timeframe.
aim for a MAP of 90 (this is ideal for cerebral perfusion pressures to be optimum)
Normoglycemia
Normothermia
Head up, minimize movements
Urgent Neurosurgical care
Maintain parameters at all times, even if the transfer is for short periods
Monitor pupil size, GCS, Heart rate/rhythm strip, blood pressure, pCO2, resp rate during transfer
Immobilisation and transfer methods were also touched upon, various methods to transfer patients, scoops, trolleys, mattresses, sliding sheets, boards etc
Consider Spinal shock if triad of hypotension+poikilothermia+bradycardia
Avoid fluiding with large volumes if unresponsive to fluids, consider escalating to vasopressors.
Will improve on own if spinal shock
Autonomic dysreflexia – injury above T6 (headache, flushing/sweating above level of injury, urinary retention)

Paeds

Rarely transferred. Only ever in cases of trauma/head injury
CATS
WETFLAG
Broselow tape bag
Vecuronium/pancuronium, fentanyl, ketamine (children) combo in children safe.effective cocktail

Balloon pumps- weigh 70 kg, slows movement, runs off battery

 

Another day, another training…

Attended another training/teaching day sponsored/arranged by the deanery – was a very, VERY useful and informative day – and though it dragged on for hours, it was very interesting and explained quite a few things that I had not known previously – gist of the major salient points of each of the talks are listed below – may expand on 1 or more of these topics in the near future – so inspiring!

There were 4 speakers

PUBLIC HEALTH PROMOTION – how to explore facets of public health while in ED, because most people interact with someone in the ED, and that may be the only point of medical contact they have had up until that point.
smoking cessation, weight loss, exercise, pre-diabetes identification –
screening programs are fixed, inflexible , protocoled care, applied across a particular age group- safeguarding, frailty, VTE, dementia screening, hypertension, alcohol issues, obesity, domestic violence, smoking

case scenario of overweight person presents with orthopaedic problems, upon discharge do you speak to them about their weight? as an ED physician

case scenario of unwell child who has never been vaccinated – what will you do? How do you approach the subject with the parent, or do you even approach it at all?

case scenario of alcoholic patient with head injury – would you address the alcohol issue? (unit is 8 gm or 10 ml) 25 in whiskey, 10 in wine and 40 in spirigel
alcohol problems discussion
(having withdrawal symptoms when not drinking is being dependant on alcohol)
who should you be screening for problem drinking – selected presentations
how do you ask for alcohol intake?- use PAT scale – CAGE questions are useful in establish alcohol related problems.
important because intervention is helpful

PUBLIC HEALTH AND EMERGENCY MEDICINE
as doctors/physicians it is our ethical duty to reduce injury and illness, wherever we interact with patients.
we tend to have more interaction with the general public
you are more likely to see violence/injuries than the police – some studies show more than 3 times!
how can you help as doctors? injury survielance, mandatory reporting, better design, improve treatment, collate data and improve conditions – location of assault, date/time of assault, weapon, age
is anonymous,
crime rates went down because of data collected due to targeted policing
what are barriers to implementation? – police expectations, IT issues, governance, receptionist, leads
pitfalls – mission creep, fatigue, silos
conclusion? violent injury surveillance and control is effective in reducing violence. implementation can be challenging

QI (Quality Improvement)
audits are important but rarely work
why do they fail? – tick box exercise, temporary staff, lack of feedback, career advancement a priority rather than care advancement, lack of collective responsibility (if your rotation ends, the audit ends with you, no continuity)
has now become quality assurance rather than improvement. “maintaining/meeting set standards” rather than “improving the standards”
RCEM guide to QI is the QI bible.
do less, do it better
choose a standard to improve:is it important?, is it fundamental?, is it fixable?
talk to the stakeholders (nursing staff, frontline staff, triage, juniors, etc), ask them why this is not happening – how to improve conditions?
measure the standard
intervene to implement a change, and then re-measure after a suitable timeframe.
establish or convey a sense of crisis – reiterate how important/imperative this measurement is.
rapid cycle

CARDIOLOGY – ACS
definition of ACS
reiteration of importance of history – onset and character
repeat ecg, compare with previous
do not delay treatment waiting for biomarkers in “cardiac-sounding” chest pain.
consider bedside imaging if hemodynamic instability
escalate appropriately, consider involvement of tertiary care
dissection a differential? CT aorta stat (discussion about d dimer as useful in this scenario – some people say a negative d dimer rules out a dissection – research shows that is not the case)
management – analgesia+dual antiplatelet therapy, GP2B3AI, antihypertensives (b blockers) ACEI. statin, REGARDLESS OFWHETHER AN INTERVENTION TAKES PLACE LATER ON OR NOT, GIVE THE MEDICAL TREATMENT. if already on aspirin, 300 or 225 of aspirin either way doesn’t matter, 600 of clopidogrel and 80 of tigacrelor (not to use if warfarinized – MAKE SURE INR IS THERAPEUTIC)
immediate management – angio +/- PCI (for STEMI within window, ongoing symptoms, cariogenic shock, for NSTEMI – hemodynamic instability, ongoing schema or shock, IF REFRACTORY TO INITIAL MEDICAL THERAPY)
high risk/labile/recurrent schema – urgent angio
all others get routine angio
12 hours stemi – def PPCI, greater than 12 hours – if symptoms, PPCI, greater than 48 hours – no PPCI.
<30 mins door in door out in non pic centers. <60 mins door to wire crossing in PCI centre. and LBBB/RBBB considered equally. no o2 if >90 sats on RA.
consider CPAP, IF DISTRESS. iv amiodarone for AF, Look for hyperglycaemic states, MRA if CF.

if unable to decide if LBBB is new or old, compare to previous but if none available to compare, look at the patient. vast majority are not acute, unless they’re in cariogenic shock.

 

DIARRHOEA
definition
types
causes
symptoms
may be a symptom of sepsis – does not mean primary focus is gastrointestinal- particularly in the elderly
rotavirus most common in children – vaccine now available, rotarix at 8 and 12 weeks, seasonal
COD – dehydration/acidosis
use dioralyte instead of pure water for replacement. diluted juice.
norovirus and c.difficile has to be reported.
electrolyte disturbances – hypo/hypernatremia, acidosis, acidosis, hypoklemia (3-3.5: oral replacement or 20/1000 ml saline over 2-3 hours; 2.5-3: 40/litre over 4-6 hours; <2.5 or with ecg changes at any low level such as prolonged QTC, flat t waves at risk of arrhythmia; <1.5 will be paralysed, muscular weakness, apneoic. ECG-CARDIAC MONITOR-CONSIDER RESUS
discussion about hyponatremia and its management

 

PALPITATIONS
multiple cases discussed and shown, along with rhythm strips, interactive 1 hour session with responses from the audience tailoring the talk. VERY interesting.

Interesting Observations on a mock OSCE Teaching Day

Hi all – so a few days back I had the unique opportunity to organize (OK who am I kidding? I helped to organise) a 1-day course for the FRCA OSCE exam in our deanery. We as the juniors of the department of anaesthetics/ITU/Theaters were called upon to help with various tasks: timekeeper for the different stations, be a patient for history taking, or be one of the relatives for counselling, be a mannequin for examinations, etc. I had a multitude of nominal tasks on the day, but what I found to be invaluable to me that day were a few observations that I made observing the various candidates as they filed through the different stations, and I list those observations here in no particular order to be taken as advice for all my colleagues who have OSCEs to take, bear these in mind:

– Be cognisant of time. As you walk up to the OSCE station, whether it gives you 30 seconds to read through an initial scenario or there is a piece of paper with questions written on it that you are expect to answer, get into the mental zone where you can mould yourself to give what is required of that particular station in the time provided. If there is one question that needs to be answered, you can be a bit relaxed, if there are 3 questions on the paper, make sure you are aware of the time you have to divide amongst them all to do justice to all. If the station requires an interaction with someone like a viva or a direct encounter, make sure you have a framework in mind, a mental checklist to check things off during the actual station so that you are not rambling on about your second point when there are 7 other things you need to be talking about.

–  When asked a question, don’t feel pressured to answer as soon as you sit down – take a breath, pause, ponder over the question for a few seconds, frame your answer for the next few, and then open your mouth to speak. Do not repeat the question back to the examiner in wonderment, as if puzzling it over, you may think you are buying time while you collect your thoughts, but it looks unprofessional. If you need time to answer, take it, but do not insult the examiners’ intelligence by repeating the question back word for word. It is a waste of time.

– When asked a question, avoid using pronouns like ‘you’ as a general term. “If you are on the floor for a long time, your creatinine kinase levels may rise.” While correct, it looks like you are addressing the examiner, whereas a more professional way to answer would be “Patients lying on the floor for extended periods of time may have elevated levels of creatinine kinase.”

– Following on from the previous point – when describing the anatomical location of anything, or a function, it is OK to use your hands to express yourself, but do not gesture towards your own body as a descriptor for your answer. In answer to the question Where can an IO needle be inserted? you may think it is the right answer to point to your sternum, your humerus or your tibial tuberosity, but it won’t score you any points. Also please practise certain expressions or gestures, gesturing towards your crotch for instance when talking about urinary catheterisation is inappropriate. And for goodness sake, it is even worse to point these things out on the examiners body.

– Use proper terminology, use buzzwords if you know them (we all know them) and specific things carry specific marks so make sure you attend some sort of course at least once in your life for OSCE practise so that you know what the examiner is looking for in a particular station when they ask you a particular question. Also, examiners know when you are beating about the bush and not getting to the point – so don’t waste their time (and yours), admit you do not know, and move on.

– Having done poorly in a previous station has no bearing on how you can or should perform in the next one – so do not let anything bother you. Yes, you may well have failed the previous station, but if you continue to mull over it or let it get to you, you may ruin your chances of passing the next one as well. Once you step out of one station, close that chapter, and open the next one with a clean slate.

–  Do not try to impress with big words and fancy terms – be simple, logical and just answer to the best of your knowledge. They are there to test your knowledge and see how good you are with using that knowledge. They are not there to ask for your hand in marriage.

–  If there is a written station, please write clearly. In our current professional examination climate, where usually there is a tick box or a fill-in-the-correct-circle type answer sheets, we forget how to answer the short answer type questions. Make sure it is legible. Your right answer is useless if no one can decipher it.

–  Read up on the simple things (in case of our anaesthetics colleagues, anatomy and physiology, undoubtedly – aside from the usual physics etc) – understand the concept behind why something is done or not done, and it will make it easier for you in these exams.

–  Study. I don’t know why it is so under-rated, that OSCE exams are interaction based and so I just don’t need to read up on how to take a history or do a pre-op assessment or perform a physical examination or test the cranial nerves – we do it everyday, and we get into a comfortable zone – but the exam might need for us to brush up on those skills and make sure we are not missing out on anything. MOST candidates missed an important part of the history taking station, as well as the counselling station – points were docked, valuable points, and for some that can mean the difference between passing and failing.

Guest Blog Post by Dr. Hassan Alraee – “My MRCEM OSCE Experience”

This is our second guest blog post from esteemed colleague Dr. Hassan Alraee – Emergency Medicine Registrar (Ireland). I take no credit for the following text.

Dear Colleagues,
I am sharing my MRCEM OSCE experience with you guys as I realized while preparing for the exam there was not much guidance available online. The aim of this post is to familiarize everyone with what the exam entails and a few tips which may be helpful in your preparation for the OSCE.
This may not be a structured or typical guidance post, it may come out as a random collection of thoughts but I will try my best to note down everything that was helpful to me during the preparation for the OSCE.
First of all to be eligible to appear in the exam you need to have passed the FRCEM Primary exam, passing the FRCEM Intermediate SAQ exam is NOT one of the eligibility criteria. However, in my experience passing the FRCEM Intermediate SAQ exam gives you a baseline in theoretical knowledge that is required for the OSCE. So it would be ideal to attempt the exams in the sequence that has been set, i.e. Primary, Intermediate and OSCE.
Before beginning your preparation for the exam have a look at the MRCEM Information Pack available on the RCEM website. A list of study material that may be helpful includes;
1. MCEM Part C: 125 OSCE Stations by Kiran Somani
2. Mastering Emergency Medicine: A Practical Guide by Mathew Hall
3. Bromley Webinars
4. At least 1 (if not more) of the following courses; The London Clinical Course, The Bromley Course or the Manchester Course.
The exam itself feels like a daunting task during the preparation phase as it is completely different to the previous parts and reading books alone is not the best way to get through it. My advice would be to stick to one of the above mentioned books and go through it once. The next step would be to create a practice group which should comprise of at least 3 members. This would mean all 3 of you would be able to rotate through different roles during the practice sessions, i.e. The candidate, The actor and The examiner. In my humble opinion this practice group is the key to being successful in the exam. The final step would be to book one of the above mentioned courses. In order to maximize the courses you need to be fully prepared for the exam by the time you attend the course and treat it as a Mock Examination.
Each of the courses has their own pros and cons but all of them are helpful in preparing you for the OSCE.
Each OSCE comprises of 18 stations, 2 of which are rest stations. The exam does not test your theoretical knowledge to a great extent, the stations in the OSCE are designed to test various skills. Like all OSCE exams there is a fair degree of play acting and exaggeration of your daily practices is required. By this I mean that the examiner will only mark you on the actions you perform during the exam, so make sure you show every step and tick most boxes in the examiner’s checklist.
The basic outline of the stations encountered within the OSCE are;
1) There are 2 to 3 history taking stations, remember to complete the station by giving the patient a management plan based on the history.
2) A Systemic examination station (CVS, Respiratory, Abdominal, Cranial Nerve or Peripheral Vascular examination)
3) A Joint examination station (Hip, Shoulder, Knee, Back, C-spine or a limb examination)
4) A Breaking Bad News scenario
5) There are 2 or 3 teaching stations which may include teaching a procedure or examination to a student or a junior doctor.
6) There is always a Conflict Resolution in the OSCE as well, which may be a missed fracture or pneumothorax or a difficult referral. This station also includes talking to a patient with Alcohol Dependence or Binge Drinking.
7) 2 scenarios within the OSCE are always Resuscitation Scenarios and test your skills in ACLS, APLS or ATLS. These stations seem like they are the most difficult ones while preparing for the exam, but in my opinion you can easily pass these if you make a good approach towards resus stations during your practice sessions. The Key to the resus scenarios is sticking to the ABCDE approach.
8) ENT and Eye station; in the exam they can check your knowledge on these in various ways it can be a simple otoscopic or ophthalmoscopic examination, teaching may be incorporated into it or history taking could be tested but there will always be a station that will involve ENT or Eye.
9) A quick assessment station; this one is a tricky one, it usually has the task of taking a short history, performing a focused examination and formulating a management plan based on your findings and summarizing it to the patient.
10) An Information Providing station; this station usually involves a relative of the patient to whom you have to explain a new diagnosis or management of a medical condition. Juvenile Diabetes Mellitus and Addision’s Disease are 2 examples that I can recall.
11) A Psychiatric Station is always present in the OSCE, you may be asked to performed a Mental state examination on a patient or assess suicide risk, they may add a conflict resolution component to this station as well.

In my opinion if you divide your preparation according to these 11 types of stations you will be able to cover most of the things required to be successful. Some additional topics that are tested in different ways and I haven’t categorized under the stations include; DVT, major incidents, seizures and driving advice. It would be wise to look up the NICE guidelines on these.
I would also suggest that you reach the city where the exam is being held one day earlier and have a look at your examination center that day. Just so you know how long it takes to get there and don’t have the extra stress of finding the center on the morning of the exam. Please spend your last 2 days traveling and relaxing, there is no point in trying to cram in stuff over the last 2-3 days as this is not a theoretical exam where they expect you to know everything.
On the exam day itself it is understandable to be anxious and stressed and believe me the examiners know that the candidates are under pressure and are not there to fail you. You should know that staying cool and calm is the most important feature that will enable you to be successful. It usually takes 1 or 2 stations to get into the groove of the exam as the 1st station comes up it is normal to feel a little nervous or blank out temporarily. Do not act bold and wing it if you are unsure about something, be safe at this stage and say you are unable to recall at this point in time and that you will consult the department policy or your consultant before implementing it.
Do not worry if any of your stations don’t go as well as you expected them to, leave the previous station behind you and move on to the next one. Do not let your performance on the previous station affect your performance on the next one. I know this is easier said than done but it has to be said as it is human nature to dwell on the past. You should also know that there is not a minimum number of stations that need to be passed to pass the exam, that was how it used to be in the past. The marking scheme has changed to a cumulative score now and a different passing mark is set for every OSCE day so even if you fail a station you carry forward marks from it towards your overall score. Therefore it is imperative that you score marks for the basic things on each station. Some of these include greeting the actor, washing hands before and after examination, wearing personal protective equipment (or at least mentioning it to the examiner), being warm and courteous and thanking the actor at the end. These simple things may be the difference between a pass and fail score in your OSCE.
I hope it was helpful for all those that are reading this post, good luck with your exam, with a bit of structure and practice I’m sure you will pass the OSCE.